My Blog

Posts for: August, 2017

By John Leitner DDS
August 29, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
NewFrontTeethforaTeenagedDavidDuchovny

In real life he was a hard-charging basketball player through high school and college. In TV and the movies, he has gone head-to-head with serial killers, assorted bad guys… even mysterious paranormal forces. So would you believe that David Duchovny, who played Agent Fox Mulder in The X-Files and starred in countless other large and small-screen productions, lost his front teeth… in an elevator accident?

“I was running for the elevator at my high school when the door shut on my arm,” he explained. “The next thing I knew, I was waking up in the hospital. I had fainted, fallen on my face, and knocked out my two front teeth.” Looking at Duchovny now, you’d never know his front teeth weren’t natural. But that’s not “movie magic” — it’s the art and science of modern dentistry.

How do dentists go about replacing lost teeth with natural-looking prosthetics? Today, there are two widely used tooth replacement procedures: dental implants and bridgework. When a natural tooth can’t be saved — due to advanced decay, periodontal disease, or an accident like Duchovny’s — these methods offer good looking, fully functional replacements. So what’s the difference between the two? Essentially, it’s a matter of how the replacement teeth are supported.

With state-of-the-art dental implants, support for the replacement tooth (or teeth) comes from small titanium inserts, which are implanted directly into the bone of the jaw. In time these become fused with the bone itself, providing a solid anchorage. What’s more, they actually help prevent the bone loss that naturally occurs after tooth loss. The crowns — lifelike replacements for the visible part of the tooth — are securely attached to the implants via special connectors called abutments.

In traditional bridgework, the existing natural teeth on either side of a gap are used to support the replacement crowns that “bridge” the gap. Here’s how it works: A one-piece unit is custom-fabricated, consisting of prosthetic crowns to replace missing teeth, plus caps to cover the adjacent (abutment) teeth on each side. Those abutment teeth must be shaped so the caps can fit over them; this is done by carefully removing some of the outer tooth material. Then the whole bridge unit is securely cemented in place.

While both systems have been used successfully for decades, bridgework is now being gradually supplanted by implants. That’s because dental implants don’t have any negative impact on nearby healthy teeth, while bridgework requires that abutment teeth be shaped for crowns, and puts additional stresses on them. Dental implants also generally last far longer than bridges — the rest of your life, if given proper care. However, they are initially more expensive (though they may prove more economical in the long run), and not everyone is a candidate for the minor surgery they require.

Which method is best for you? Don’t try using paranormal powers to find out: Come in and talk to us. If you would like more information about tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework,” and “Dental Implants.”


By JOHN LEITNER DDS
August 14, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: family dentistry  

Would you dental appointments that are less hectic and more convenient? Are you tired of running all over town seeing one dentist for yourfamily dentistry needs, another for Mom or Dad and yet another for your children? With our Grand Haven, MI family dentist, Dr. John Leitner, you and your loved ones can enjoy a relaxed, patient-centered experience no matter your age or what your oral health needs are. Dr. Leitner is a true family dentist, possessing a wide skill set encompassing preventive, restorative and cosmetic dentistry. It's all for you, and it's in one convenient location.

Prevention is the cornerstone

Your Grand Haven family dentist recommends twice daily brushing and once a day flossing according to the standards set by the American Dental Association. Then, Dr. Leitner expands on what you and your family do at home with semi-annual oral examinations and cleanings which help prevent tooth decay and gum disease and also detect problems while they are small and highly treatable.

Conscientious preventive dentistry involves the latest in diagnostics. Dr. Leitner employs:

  • Digital X-rays for instant viewing and paperless storage
  • Tek Scan bite analysis to ensure your teeth come together correctly
  • Microscopic examination of teeth and gums to reveal hidden cavities and gum issues

And, the dental team offers mouthguards, TMJ and sleep apnea analysis, and fluoride treatments, services which keep your teeth and gums safe and strong and your overall well-being vibrant. With the results of your examination, Dr. Leitner composes your individualized treatment plan which includes preventive measures and also restorative and cosmetic recommendations.

Restorations bring back health, form and function

Your family dentist encounters gum disease and dental decay in patients of all ages. These conditions are leading causes of tooth loss in the United States. If you or a loved one has a small cavity or mild gingivitis, or if more advanced problems are uncovered, rest assured Dr. Leitner is prepared to restore your smile.

His restorative treatments include:

  • Tooth-colored fillings
  • Extractions
  • Root canal therapy
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Dentures
  • Dental Implants and mini-implants
  • Treatment of TMJ (jaw joint dysfunction), migraines and bruxism, or teeth clenching

Dr. Leitner and his team also use the innovative Canary System which finds very small cavities undetected by other standard methods. Dr. Leitner can treat cavities when they are much smaller (meaning less pain and less cost). In addition to conventional scaling and root planing for gum disease, your Grand Haven family dentist offers Periolase gum therapy, employing a no-cutting, no suturing LASER to debride and heal infected gum tissue.

Improving dental aesthetics

You and your loved ones should feel good about how their smiles look. As such, Dr. Leitner offers many cosmetic services to enhance tooth shape, color and alignment. Whether your teen needs a porcelain veneer to disguise a chipped front tooth or you or your Mom desire a brighter smile through professional whitening, you'll find it at Dr. Leitner's dental office.

Come see us

And bring the family for the finest dental care in the Grand Haven, MI, area. For appointments, contact the office at (616) 842-2850.


LasersCouldOneDaybeCommonplaceforTreatingGumDisease

There are a variety of methods for treating periodontal (gum) disease depending on its severity — from routine office cleanings to periodontal surgery. But the goal behind all of them remains the same: remove bacterial plaque and calculus (tartar), the root cause for gum disease, from all tooth and gum surfaces.

The traditional method for doing this is called scaling in which we use special hand instruments (scalers) to mechanically remove plaque and calculus. Scaling and a similar procedure called root planing (the root surfaces are “planed” smooth of plaque to aid tissue reattachment) require quite a bit of skill and experience. They're also time-consuming: full treatment can take several sessions, depending on how extensive the infection has spread.

In recent years, we've also seen a new method emerge for removing plaque: lasers. Commonly used in other aspects of healthcare, lasers utilize a focused beam of light to destroy and remove diseased or unhealthy tissue while, according to studies and firsthand accounts, minimizing healthy tissue destruction to a better degree than traditional techniques. Procedure and healing times are likewise reduced.

Because of these beneficial characteristics, we are seeing their use in gum disease treatment, especially for removing diseased and inflamed tissues below the gum line and decreasing sub-gingival (“below the gums”) bacteria.

Dentists who have used lasers in this way do report less tissue damage, bleeding and post-treatment discomfort than traditional treatments. But because research is just beginning, there's not enough evidence to say laser treatment is preferably better than conventional treatment for gum disease.

At this point, lasers can be an effective addition to conventional gum disease treatment for certain people, especially those in the early stages of the disease. As we continue to study this technology, though, the day may come when lasers are the preferred way to stop gum disease from ruining your dental health.

If you would like more information on treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Lasers Versus Traditional Cleanings for Treating Gum Disease.”


By John Leitner DDS
August 06, 2017
Category: Oral Health
LifeIsSometimesaGrindforBrookeShields

Ever since childhood, when her career as a model and actress took off, Brooke Shields has enjoyed worldwide recognition — through advertisements for designer jeans, appearances on The Muppet Show, and starring roles in big-screen films. But not long ago, that familiar face was spotted in an unusual place: wearing a nasal anesthesia mask at the dentist's office. In fact, Shields posted the photo to her own Instagram account, with the caption “More dental surgery! I grind my teeth!” And judging by the number of comments the post received, she's far from alone.

In fact, researchers estimate that around one in ten adults have dental issues that stem from teeth grinding, which is also called bruxism. (Many children also grind their teeth, but it rarely causes serious problems, and is often outgrown.) About half of the people who are teeth grinders report problems like persistent headaches, jaw tenderness and sore teeth. Bruxism may also result in excessive tooth wear, and may damage dental work like crowns and bridges; in severe cases, loosened or fractured teeth have been reported.

Researchers have been studying teeth grinding for many years; their findings seem to indicate that it has no single cause. However, there are a number of factors that play a significant role in this condition. One is the anatomy of the jaw itself, and the effect of worn or misaligned teeth on the bite. Another factor relates to changes in brain activity that occur during the sleep cycle. In fact, nocturnal (nighttime) bruxism is now classified as a sleep-related movement disorder. Still other factors, such as the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs, and a high level of stress or anxiety, can make an individual more likely to experience bruxism.

What can be done for people whose teeth grinding is causing problems? Since this condition may have many causes, a number of different treatments are available. Successful management of bruxism often begins by striving to eliminate the factors that may cause problems — for example, making lifestyle changes to improve your health, creating a soothing nighttime environment, and trying stress-reduction techniques; these may include anything from warm baths and soft music at bedtime, to meditation and mindfulness exercises.

Several dental treatments are also available, including a custom-made occlusal guard (night guard) that can keep your teeth from being damaged by grinding. In some cases, a bite adjustment may also be recommended: In this procedure, a small amount of enamel is removed from a tooth to change the way it contacts the opposite tooth, thereby lessening the biting force on it. More invasive techniques (such as surgery) are rarely needed.

A little tooth grinding once in a while can be a normal response to stress; in fact, becoming aware of the condition is often the first step to controlling it. But if you begin to notice issues that could stem from bruxism — or if the loud grinding sounds cause problems for your sleeping partner — it may be time to contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more about bruxism in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Stress and Tooth Habits.”