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By John Leitner DDS
April 17, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
BillRancicsSmileHelpsClosetheDeal

Can having a great smile help land you a high-level business position, a TV show, and a bride? Maybe — at least if you go by the example of Bill Rancic.

The 42-year-old Chicago native is well known as the first winner of NBC-TV's The Apprentice, a reality show where contestants vied for a job with Donald Trump's organization. Shortly after his selection as Trump's newest hire, Rancic met his future wife, Giuliana, when she interviewed him for E! News. Flash forward a few years, and the couple is now hosting their own reality TV show on Style network.

So how much has Bill's winning smile helped?

“I think a great smile says a lot about a person — especially in our professions,” Bill recently said in an interview with Dear Doctor magazine. He also mentioned that having a few cosmetic dental treatments helped him close the deal.

As a child, Bill wore braces to correct an overbite. For both kids and adults, orthodontic treatment is often the first step toward getting the smile of your dreams. The practice of orthodontics has changed dramatically in the past 20 years and there are now a number of choices available in lieu of traditional metal braces.

Not Your Father's Braces
For those who need to maintain a “professional” image, tooth-colored braces offer a less noticeable way to straighten your teeth. Lingual braces are another option that's suitable in some situations. These are truly invisible: bonded on the tongue side of the teeth, they can't be seen from the front.

Or, you may be able to forego braces altogether and use a series of clear plastic aligners to gradually bring your teeth into alignment. Not only are these difficult to notice, but they can be completely removed for short periods of time — at important board meetings, for example.

Red-Carpet Tooth Whitening
More recently, Rancic had tooth whitening treatments. Depending on the degree of lightening needed, these can range from custom-fitted bleaching trays that you wear at home under the supervision of a dentist, to in-office whitening treatments that work in far less time. Both can be effective in lightening your teeth by six shades or more.

But if you need the ultimate in whitening, veneers may be the best option. These are fingernail-thin coatings, made of pearly-white porcelain or composite material, that are placed directly on the tooth surfaces. Realistic and durable, they can provide a “Hollywood white” smile that's ready for the red carpet.

Did Bill's cosmetic dental work really improve his life? We can't say for sure — but as his wife Giuliana recently told Dear Doctor, “First impressions are very important, and having a beautiful smile will help anyone make a great impact on others.” So perhaps it worked on her!

If you would like more information on how cosmetic dental treatments can improve your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Magic of Orthodontics” and “Important Teeth Whitening Questions Answered.”

PatientsonBloodThinnersRequirePrecautionsBeforeandDuringOralSurgery

The proliferation of drugs to treat all manner of diseases and conditions has heightened concerns not only about general side effects, but also how a particular drug may affect treatments for other conditions. There are indications, for example, that drugs classified as blood thinners could cause complications for patients undergoing oral surgery.

Blood thinners like Warfarin are typically prescribed to patients with artificial heart valves or who are at significant risk for stroke, heart attack, or the formation of clots that could potentially damage the heart and lungs. The drug reduces the coagulation (clotting) mechanism in blood; aspirin taken regularly should also be considered a blood thinner.

As with any invasive procedure, blood thinners can complicate oral surgery. Blood doesn’t clot normally and so bleeding during a procedure is more difficult to stop. This doesn’t necessarily mean the surgery can’t be performed. For one thing, many oral procedures like tooth removal involve little trauma to tissues and bleeding in the hands of a careful and experienced surgeon. The surgeon can also use hemostatic agents during surgery that will stabilize blood clotting, as well as suturing the incision in such a way as to reduce bleeding from surface capillaries. In the case of a tooth extraction, a bone graft placed within the empty socket not only reduces bone loss from a missing tooth, but can also enhance bleeding control.

In consultation with your medical doctor, it’s also possible to temporarily stop or reduce your medication dosage in anticipation of a pending oral surgery. While it may not be safe to stop the drug altogether, a reduced dosage can ease the anti-coagulant effect and reduce any complications from bleeding that might occur during the surgery. You can then resume normal dosage soon after the procedure.

During your pre-op examination, it’s important to let your surgeon know about any drugs you are currently taking, including over-the-counter drugs like aspirin. The oral surgeon will then be able to take the necessary steps, including working with your medical doctor, to ensure your surgical procedure is safe and uneventful.

If you would like more information on oral surgery precautions while taking blood thinners and other medication, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Surgery & Blood Thinners.”

By John Leitner DDS
March 18, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
HowardSternOpensUp-AboutHisTeeth

Is there anything that radio and TV personality (and self-proclaimed “King of All Media”) Howard Stern doesn’t want to talk about in public? Maybe not — but it took a caller’s on-air question to get the infamous shock jock to open up about his own dental work.

When he was directly asked if his teeth were capped, Stern said no. “I redid ‘em [some time] ago… I had bonding and um… veneers… over my real teeth. But I don’t get that ‘Hollywood white’ though,” he said, before adding his uncensored opinion on the subject of proper tooth shades.

As we’re sure Stern would be the first to point out, everyone has a right to their own opinion. But we’re pleased that Howard brought up an important point about veneers: They are custom-made in a whole range of different shades, from a more ‘natural’ tooth color to a brilliant white shine. Which one you select depends on what look is right for you — and that’s your choice.

In case you aren’t familiar with veneers, they are fingernail-thin coverings made of porcelain, which are bonded onto the surfaces of the teeth. This enables them to hide a number of defects — like chips, discoloration, and even small irregularities in spacing. They can also be used to lengthen teeth that seem out of proportion to the gums, lips or other facial features.

Veneers are among the cosmetic dental treatments most favored by Hollywood stars… as well as regular folks who want a dramatic improvement in their smile. Unlike crowns (caps), which generally require extensive reshaping of the tooth, standard veneers require the removal of just fractions of a millimeter of tooth surface. That makes them a minimally invasive method of smile enhancement that can make a big difference in your appearance. In fact, veneers are often a major part of a complete “smile makeover.”

Dental veneers are custom made in a laboratory from a mold of your teeth. They are designed to fit your teeth perfectly — and to be just the shade you want. When you come in for a consultation, we will discuss what you like and don’t like about your smile, and how we might improve it. Will you opt to get the brilliant “red-carpet” smile you always wished for… or go for a subtle, more natural tooth color? Only you can decide.

Howard Stern’s veneers may be the most restrained thing about him… but we’re just glad that veneers helped him get the kind of smile he wanted. You can, too. If you would like more information on dental veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By John Leitner DDS
March 03, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
UnderstandingtheProcessofDentalImplants

If you’ve been reviewing tooth replacement options, you probably already know the superior benefits of dental implants: their durability, functionality and life-like quality could provide you with years, even decades of satisfying service.

If you take this option, however, you should be prepared for a slightly longer process than a couple of office visits. From concept to permanent crown placement, it will require several months of preparation, expertise and teamwork. The more you know about this process, the better prepared you’ll be to handle it.

After careful preparation, which may include extracting the tooth being replaced, the process begins in earnest with the surgical placement of the implant’s titanium post into the jawbone. The surgeon uses a guide based on your bite and mouth structure to precisely implant the post in a pre-planned location: this ensures that the permanent crown will be affixed in the right location for best appearance and functionality.

While a temporary crown can sometimes be attached immediately after implantation, the permanent crown must wait until the bone grows and attaches around the titanium post (osseointegration). Once this has occurred, usually over several months, the implant can fully support the permanent crown and its function.

This last element, the permanent crown, is in many ways a work of art. Taking into consideration the patient’s facial features and shape, the type of tooth replaced and the tooth coloring natural to the patient which is transmitted this information to the dental technician who will manufacture the crown. The goal is to produce a life-like replica that will look natural and perform well.

It may seem quite involved, but all these stages are necessary for a successful outcome. Although dental implants take careful attention and time, the outcome is worth it. In the end you’ll not only recover lost function, you’ll also have a new, transformed smile.

If you would like more information on the procedures for placing dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Evaluating Your Professional Options for Care.”

By John Leitner DDS
February 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dentist   Grand Haven  
dentist Grand Haven MIPatients, young and old, enjoy a little myth busting now and then. And today is that day. Dr. John Leitner, Grand Haven dentist, discloses on a dental myth that you and your family can smile about!
 

Myth: Eating too much sugar causes cavities

From kids to adults, the age-old warning is that too much sugar will rot your teeth. In a way, this is true, but it’s not about the amount of sugar you eat—it’s how long the sugar remains on your teeth. Bacteria love to feed on sugar and produce acid, which breaks down the tooth’s enamel. Look at these two scenarios:
 
Scenario 1:
You have a box of chocolate and eat the entire box in five minutes. Afterwards, you take a glass of water and rinse out the excess sugar. After waiting 30 minutes, you brush your teeth with a soft-bristle brush and toothpaste.
 
Scenario 2:
You sip a sugar-free soda over the span of an hour. You rinse your mouth out with water and brush your teeth right away.
 
Which scenario is the worst for your teeth?
 
You may be thinking—the first one because it has sugar and you had to wait longer to brush your teeth. Actually, scenario 2 would harm your teeth more—for two reasons. First, the sugary chocolate only rested on your teeth for five minutes. In scenario 2, the drink may be sugar-free, but the soda is also carbonated, which means its high in acid. And acid is the main culprit for enamel erosion. You were sipping the soda for over an hour, constantly bathing your teeth in the carbonation.
 
Second, scenario 1 is better because you wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth. In scenario 2, you brush them right away, and that could damage your enamel because you end up pushing the acid deeper into the tooth. If you wait at least 30 minutes, your saliva works to wash away acids and remineralize the enamel.
 
We hope you enjoyed this blog post. If you have a dental concern or want to schedule an appointment with your Grand Haven dentist, call (616) 842-2850. Do you have any more dental myths you want to learn about? Let us know, and your Grand Haven family dentist can provide the answers!




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